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Sometimes I Think About It

Essays
Stephen Elliott
In Sometimes I Think About It, Stephen Elliott gathers personal essays, reportage, and profiles written over fifteen years to tell a powerful story about outsiders and underdogs.
            Moving from the self to the civic, the book begins with a series of essays that trace Elliott’s childhood with an abusive and erratic father, his life on the streets as a teenager, and his growing interest in cross-dressing and masochism. These stories, which range from a comic portrait of a week spent hosting his younger brother to a brutal depiction of depression, provide a context for the essays that follow.
            Stepping out into the world, Elliott tells of a man who loses his family in a rock slide in Southern California, explores the vexing realities of life in Palestine, and paints a chilling picture of a young man caught in the prison-industrial complex. The last section, “The Business of America Is Business,” shows Elliott’s abiding interest in the spectacle of money in America, from pop music to pornography to publishing, and it concludes with an off-kilter account of the tech industry’s assault on West Los Angeles.
            Building on the extraordinary storytelling that characterized his breakout book, The Adderall Diaries, Elliott’s search for dignity and happiness leads him to tell with great sympathy the stories of those who are broken and seek to be whole.

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$16.00
ISBN
978-1-55597-775-7
Format
Paperback
Publication Date
Pages
208
Trim Size
5.5 x 8.25
An essay collection by a writer who “may be writing under . . . the influence of genius” (Vanity Fair)

About the Author

Stephen  Elliott
Credit: Katherine Emery
Stephen Elliott is the author of The Adderall Diaries, Happy Baby, and the essay collection Sometimes I Think About It. He is the founding editor of the Rumpus and the director of the movies About Cherry and After Adderall.

https://www.stephenelliott.com/
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Praise

  • “Dark, ruminative and piercing. At his best, Elliott depicts how tragedy and pain can actually bring people together.”Shelf Awareness
  • “Frankly intimate and frequently funny, Elliott’s observations. . . open distances that you sensed but couldn’t see until he showed you: there, there.”—Padma Viswanathan
  • “I love these essays so hard I want to chew on them. For the bite of it. . . .  Sometimes I Think About It is an outsider tour de force.”—Lidia Yuknavitch
     
  • “In lean, often heartbreaking prose, Stephen Elliott gives us an American landscape defined by lost opportunities for human connection.”—Alex Mar
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