Skip to main navigation Skip to main content

The Next American Essay

Edited by John D'Agata
In this singular collection, John D'Agata takes a literary tour of lyric essays written by the masters of the craft. Beginning with 1975 and John McPhee's ingenious piece, "The Search for Marvin Gardens," D'Agata selects an example of creative nonfiction for each subsequent year. These essays are unrestrained, elusive, explosive, mysterious—a personal lingual playground. They encompass and illuminate culture, myth, history, romance, and sex. Each essay is a world of its own, a world so distinctive it resists definition.

Contributors include:

Sherman Alexie
David Antin
Jenny Boully
Anne Carson
Guy Davenport
Lydia Davis
Joan Didion
Annie Dillard
Thalia Field
Albert Goldbarth
Susan Griffin
Theresa Hak Kung Cha
Jamaica Kincaid
Wayne Koestenbaum
Barry Lopez
John McPhee
Carole Maso
Harry Mathews
Susan Mitchell
Fabio Morabito
Mary Ruefle
David Shields
Dennis Silk
Susan Sontag
Alexander Theroux
George W. S. Trow
David Foster Wallace
Eliot Weinberger
Joe Wenderoth
James Wright

Share Title

$20.00
ISBN
978-1-55597-375-9
Format
Paperback
Publication Date
Pages
488
Trim Size
6 x 9
A rich and varied anthology of lyric essays by some of America's most daring and exciting writers

About the Author

John  D'Agata
Credit: Thomas Langdon
John D’Agata is the editor of The Making of the American Essay, the author of Halls of Fame and The Lifespan of a Fact, and the editor of The Next American Essay and The Lost Origins of the Essay. He teaches creative writing at the University of Iowa, where he directs the Nonfiction Writing Program.

https://www.johndagata.com/
More by author

Praise

  • “A genuinely exhilarating work of literary history.”—Booklist
  • "D'Agata's collection raises a lot of new questions about the essay, and in doing so piques our interest in the genre. It's difficult to think of a nobler, more worthwhile achievement for a literary anthology."Rain Taxi Review of Books
  • “[T]his book shows what the essay is and what, with any luck, it will be. The collection is full of pleasures and surprises, the most stunning of which is the ongoing essay by D’Agata himself—he transforms a mere anthology into the living biography of an art form.”—Michael Silverblatt, “Bookworm,” Public Radio
Back to Table of Contents